GUESTS

04-22 B.A. Binns - Characters with Cerebral Palsy

Saturday, June 18, 2016

Highlighting The Lupus Foundation of America


So many charities out there and then so many reasons for those charities.

I used to donate every time an acquaintance approached me for financial support of their personal charity. I'd buy the wrapping paper, order the frozen pizzas, support marathons--anything to combat whatever cause. Over the years, and after surprise revelations on TV, I've learned to be more discerning about what I want to support and to perform due diligence to check on the organizations' budgeted portion for overhead and salaries.

One organization, however, that I don't mind highlighting is the Lupus Foundation of America. Last month, May, was Lupus awareness Month.

The organization is devoted to solving the mystery of lupus, one of the world’s cruelest, most unpredictable, and devastating diseases, while giving caring support to those who suffer from its brutal impact. We envision a life free of lupus. Its mission is to improve the quality of life for all  people affected by lupus through programs of research, education, support and advocacy.

What is Lupus?


Lupus is a chronic, autoimmune disease that can damage any part of the body (skin, joints, and/or organs inside the body). Chronic means that the signs and symptoms tend to last longer than six weeks and often for many years.
In lupus, something goes wrong with your immune system, which is the part of the body that fights off viruses, bacteria, and germs ("foreign invaders," like the flu). Normally our immune system produces proteins called antibodies that protect the body from these invaders. Autoimmune means your immune system cannot tell the difference between these foreign invaders and your body’s healthy tissues ("auto" means "self") and creates autoantibodies that attack and destroy healthy tissue. These autoantibodies cause inflammation, pain, and damage in various parts of the body.

I invite you to research further and hopefully find the organization and its cause worthy of your support.

All the best,

Michelle
Michelle Monkou writes for Harlequin Kimani, Evernight Publishing, and her indie pursuits with Stella Maris Publishing. Michelle’s website is michellemonkou.com. You can also connect with her on Facebook.

2 comments:

Judith Ashley said...

Michelle, I used to give to a dozen or so charities and when my son and grandchildren were in school, donate to every fund raising drive. I've two good friends who are executive directors of small non-profits that help children. It wasn't a hard decision to stop giving to those large charities and give to them. I've a national charity I also donate to, but I take my check to a local office and ask that my funds be put to use here. Because I take the time to do that, I've been assured my entire donation stays local.

I've a couple of acquaintances who've been diagnosed with lupus. Lively, outgoing women have become much more cautious about life. Another sad side-effect of the disease.

Diana McCollum said...

Thanks for the informative blog. I never knew much about Lupus. There are so, so many worthy charities, I wish I had a ton of money so I could donate to all of them. Like Judith, I like to keep my donations local, and make every effort to do so. Thanks for all the information.